Home > Creativity, education, Planning, Teaching, trading > Profitable ETF Trading Strategies: the power of stories

Profitable ETF Trading Strategies: the power of stories


Trade like a storyteller
We know from cognitive science and learning theory that humans are storytellers by both nature and nurture. Knowing this about how our brains are wired can help us in a couple interesting ways as lifelong  traders and learners.
Generally it is easier for most people to learn when the new information is presented in the form of a story. Therefore, when you are looking for new information about how to trade effectively, you would be well served to attend to the stories the treacher tells, and check to see if the story resonates with you.
If you can’t “get” the story, it will make it very difficult if not impossible to make sense out of the details.
If you “get” the story though, you have a storyline that acts as an organizing structure or “schema” for you to atatch the new data to.
The best stories for learning are real, short, interesting and human. That makes it easy to see how the new information can apply to you. For teachers, this means that you will improve your practice by adding short, sharp, engaging stories of real people in similar situations to where your students will be heading in the future.
Your stories will be even more powerful when they touch the emotions and provide an incentive to acheive a favorable emotional state. That’s why most of thepowerful selling techniques tell a story about a very desireable emotional state that can be achieved if only the customer will exchange money for the magic bullet.
As traders, you might consider trying to develop the “story” of a stock or an Exchange Traded Fund. By proposing a “storyline” that the target “could” follow, you can then identify price points wherre the storyline is violated and you can exit quickly because the target is following a different path or script.
There are extraordinary  possibilities for improving your trading and learning performance by appreciating the powers of stories. Can’t you just imagine it!?

We know from cognitive science and learning theory that humans are storytellers by both nature and nurture. Knowing this about how our brains are wired can help us in a couple interesting ways as lifelong traders and learners.

Generally it is easier for most people to learn when the new information is presented in the form of a story. Therefore, when you are looking for new information about how to trade effectively, you would be well served to attend to the stories the teacher tells, and check to see if the story resonates with you.

If you can’t “get” the story, it will make it very difficult if not impossible to make sense out of the details.

If you “get” the story though, you have a storyline that acts as an organizing structure or “schema” for you to attach the new data to.

The best stories for learning are real, short, interesting and human. That makes it easy to see how the new information can apply to you. For teachers, this means that you will improve your practice by adding short, sharp, engaging stories of real people in similar situations to where your students will be heading in the future.

Your stories will be even more powerful when they touch the emotions and provide an incentive to achieve a favorable emotional state. That’s why most of the powerful selling techniques tell a story about a very desirable emotional state that can be achieved if only the customer will exchange money for the magic bullet.

As traders, you might consider trying to develop the “story” of a stock or an Exchange Traded Fund. By proposing a “storyline” that the target “could” follow, you can then identify price points where the storyline is violated and you can exit quickly because the target is following a different path or script.

There are extraordinary possibilities for improving your trading and learning performance by appreciating the powers of stories. Can’t you just imagine it!?

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